Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Books Books
" Vulgarity is far worse than downright blackguardism ; for the latter comprehends wit, humour, and strong sense at times j while the former is a sad abortive attempt at all things, 'signifying nothing. "
The works of Thomas Moore - Page 110
by Thomas Moore - 1832
Full view - About this book

Letters and Journals of Lord Byron: With Notices of His Life, Volume 1

George Gordon Byron Baron Byron - 1830 - 528 pages
...•signifying nothing.' It does not depend upon low j themes, or even low language, for Fielding revels in j defect in his foot had exposed him, must have let the truth in, with dreadful certa ¡nul the scholar, sporting with his subject, — its master, not its slave. Your vulgar writer is...
Full view - About this book

Letters and Journals of Lord Byron: With Notices of His Life, Volume 1

George Gordon Byron Baron Byron - 1830 - 532 pages
...former is a sad abortive attempt at all things, j * signifying nothing.' It does not depend upon low j themes, or even low language, for Fielding revels in both ; — but is he ever vulgar 1 No. You see the man of education, the gentleman, and the scholar, sporting with his subject, —...
Full view - About this book

The Quarterly Review, Volume 44

William Gifford, Sir John Taylor Coleridge, John Gibson Lockhart, Whitwell Elwin, William Macpherson, William Smith, Sir John Murray IV, Rowland Edmund Prothero (Baron Ernle), George Walter Prothero - 1831 - 620 pages
...latter comprehends wit, humour, and strong sense at times; while the former is a sad alortive'attempt at all things, " signifying nothing." It does not...the gentleman, and the scholar, sporting with his subject,—its master, not its slave. Your vulgar writer is always most vulgar the higher his subject...
Full view - About this book

The Polar star, being a continuation of 'The Extractor', of ..., Volume 6

1831 - 444 pages
...worse than dowmight blackguardism ; for the latter comprehends wit, hnmonr, and strong sense at times ; while the former is a sad abortive attempt at all...language, for Fielding revels in both ; — but is he ever vulgurf No. You see the man of education, the gentleman, and the scholar, sporting with his subject,...
Full view - About this book

The Imperial magazine; or, Compendium of religious, moral, & philosophical ...

1831 - 616 pages
...than downright blackguardism ; for the latter comprehends wit, humour, and strong sense, at times ; while the former is a sad abortive attempt at all...upon low themes, or even low language, for Fielding revele in. both ; but is he ever wlgar? No. You see the man of education, the gentleman, and the scholar,...
Full view - About this book

The Quarterly review, Volume 44

1831 - 624 pages
...the latter comprehends wit, humour, and strong sense at times ; while the former is a sad alortive attempt at all things, " signifying nothing." It does...language, for Fielding revels in both ;— but is he evervulyar? No. You see the man of education, the gentleman, and the scholar, sporting with his subject,...
Full view - About this book

The Imperial Magazine

Samuel Drew - 1831 - 658 pages
...at times ; while the former is a nad abortive attempt at all things, " signifying nothing." It doce not depend upon low themes, or even low language, for Fielding revels ia both ; but is he ever ntlcar ? No. Von see the man of education, the gentleman, and the scholar,...
Full view - About this book

Letters & Journals of Lord Byron: With Notices of His Life, Volume 3

George Gordon Byron Baron Byron - 1833 - 684 pages
...than downright black' guardism ; for the latter comprehends wit, humour, ' and strong sense at times ; while the former is a sad ' abortive attempt at all...' ever vulgar ? No. You see the man of education, O ' the gentleman, and the scholar, sporting with his ' subject, — its master, not its slave. Your...
Full view - About this book

The Works of George Byron: With His Letters and Journals, and His Life, Volume 5

George Gordon Byron Baron Byron - 1835 - 396 pages
...than downright blackguardism ; for the latter comprehends wit, humour, and strong sense at times ; while the former is a sad abortive attempt at all...nothing.' It does not depend upon low themes, or even lowlanguage, for Fielding revels in both ; — but is he ever vulgar 9 No. You see the man of education,...
Full view - About this book

The Works of Lord Byron: With His Letters and Journals, and His Life, Volume 5

George Gordon Byron Baron Byron, Thomas Moore - 1839 - 398 pages
...than downright blackguardism ; for the latter comprehends wit, humour, and strong sense at times ; while the former is a sad abortive attempt at all...he ever vulgar ? No. You see the man of education, suh-gentle^an> and the scholar, sPorting with his u ject,— its master, not its slave. Your vulgar...
Full view - About this book




  1. My library
  2. Help
  3. Advanced Book Search
  4. Download EPUB
  5. Download PDF