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" Vulgarity is far worse than downright blackguardism ; for the latter comprehends wit, humour, and strong sense at times j while the former is a sad abortive attempt at all things, 'signifying nothing. "
The works of Thomas Moore - Page 110
by Thomas Moore - 1832
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Life, Letters, and Journals of Lord Byron

George Gordon Byron Baron Byron - 1839 - 782 pages
...than downright blackguardism ; for the latter comprehends wit, humour, and strong sense at times ; while the former is a sad abortive attempt at all...Fielding revels in both ; — but is he ever vulgar f No. You see the man of education, the gentleman, and the scholar, sporting with his subject, —...
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The Life of Lord Byron

George Gordon Byron Baron Byron - 1844 - 786 pages
...than downright blackguardism ; for the latter comprehends wit, humour, and strong sense at times ; while the former is a sad abortive attempt at all...Fielding revels in both ; — but is he ever vulgar f No. You see the man of education, the gentleman, and the scholar, sporting with his subject, —...
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The Life of Lord Byron: With His Letters and Journals

George Gordon Byron Baron Byron, Thomas Moore - 1851 - 784 pages
...than downright blackguardism ; for the latter comprehends wit, humour, and strong sense at times ; while the former is a sad abortive attempt at all...revels in both ; — but is he ever vulgar ? No. You sec the man of education, the gentleman, and the scholar, sporting with his subject, — its master,...
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The Works of Lord Byron: In Verse and Prose. Including His Letters, Journals ...

George Gordon Byron Baron Byron - 1853 - 1024 pages
...strong sense at limes ; while the former is asad abortive attempt at all things, " signifyingnothing." alunque altra terra — e che gli «tessi atroci deliiti che vi si commetlono ne boih ; — but is he evet vulgar ? No. You see the man of education, the gentleman, and the scholar,...
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Letters and Journals of Lord Byron: With Notices of His Life, Volume 2

George Gordon Byron Baron Byron - 1855 - 584 pages
...than downright blackguardism ; for the latter comprehends wit, humour, and strong sense at times ; while the former is a sad abortive attempt at all...You see the man of education, the gentleman, and the schotar, sporting with his subject, — its master, not its slave. Your vulgar writer is always most...
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Byron

John Nichol - 1880 - 240 pages
...worse than downright blackguardism ; for the latter comprehends wit, humour, and strong sense at times, while the former is a sad abortive attempt at all things, signifying nothing." He could never reconcile himself to the English radicals ; and it has been acutely remarked that part...
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Byron

John Nichol - 1880 - 240 pages
...-worse than downright blackguardism ; for the latter comprehends wit, humour, and strong sense at times, while the former is a sad abortive attempt at all things, signifying nothing." He could never reconcile himself to the English radicals ; and it has been acutely remarked, that part...
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The World's Cyclopedia of Biography, Volume 1

1883 - 776 pages
...than downright blackguardism ; for the latter comprehends wit, humour, and strong sense at all times, while the former is a sad abortive attempt at all things, signifying nothing." He could never reconcile himself to the English radicals ; and it has been acutely remarked that part...
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The Royal Readers: Special Canadian Series ..., Book 5

1883 - 528 pages
...than downright blackguardism ; for the latter comprehends wit, humor, and strong sense at all times, while the former is a sad, abortive attempt at all things, signifying nothing." He could never reconcile himself to the English Radicals ; and it has been acutely remarked that part...
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English Men of Letters, Volume 2

John Morley - 1894 - 468 pages
...worse than downright blackguardism ; for the latter comprehends wit, humour, and strong sense at times, while the former is a sad abortive attempt at all things, signifying nothing." He could never reconcile himself to the English radicals ; and it has been acutely remarked that part...
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