Engaging the Public: How Government and the Media Can Reinvigorate American Democracy

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Rowman & Littlefield, 1998 - 281 pages
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In the1996 presidential election, voters stayed away from the polls in record numbers. This volume of original essays by leading political scientists and media scholars examines the nature of political disengagement among the public and offers concrete solutions for how the government and media can stimulate public engagement in the political process. Among recommendations are more public deliberation, media responsibility, and campaign finance reform. Candidates with integrity, issues that matter, and information that is both reliable and meaningful will motivate the disaffected more surely than special-interest appeals to minorities, lower-income voters, students, and others. Further recommendations include using the Internet, structural change in registration and voting, and 'reverse socialization'.
 

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Contents

VI
9
VII
15
VIII
18
IX
27
X
39
XI
55
XII
65
XIII
73
XX
141
XXI
151
XXIII
165
XXIV
173
XXVI
183
XXVII
193
XXIX
205
XXX
215

XIV
85
XV
95
XVI
109
XVIII
121
XIX
135
XXXI
233
XXXII
263
XXXIII
275
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About the author (1998)

Thomas J. Johnson is an associate professor in the School of Journalism at Southern Illinois University at Carbondale. Carol E. Hays is a research coordinator at the Center for Prevention Research and Development at the University of Illinois. Scott P. Hays is an assistant professor of political science at Eastern Illinois University and data analyst at the Center for Prevention Research and Development at the University of Illinois.

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