Jobs Aren't Enough: Toward a New Economic Mobility for Low-income Families

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Temple University Press, 2006 - 296 pages
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This unflinching examination of the obstacles to economic mobility for low-income families exposes the ugly reality that lies beneath the shining surface of the American Dream. The fact is that nearly 25% of employed adults have difficulty supporting their families today. In eye-opening interviews, twenty-five workers and nearly a thousand people who are linked to themOCochildren, teachers, job trainers, and employersOCotell wrenching stories about trying to get ahead. Spanning five cities over five years, this study convincingly demonstrates that prevailing ideas about opportunity, merit, and bootstraps are outdated. As the authors show, some workers who believe the myths end up destroying their health and families in the process of trying to move up. "Jobs Aren't Enough" demonstrates that the social institutions of family, education, labor market, and policy all intersect to influenceOCoand inhibitOCoemployment mobility. It proposes a new mobility paradigm grounded in cooperation and collaboration across social institutions, along with revitalization of the public will."
 

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Contents

Are Jobs Enough for Economic Mobility?
1
From the Old to the New Economic Mobility
13
Their Backgrounds Lives and Locations
29
Their Lives and Worlds
60
Systems and Networks
88
Connects
119
Family Economic Mobility
200
Frequently Asked Questions about
219
Industry Firm Occupation
229
Resident Family Composition
251
References
257
Index
277
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About the author (2006)

Roberta Rehner Iversen is Associate Professor in the School of Social Policy & Practice at the University of Pennsylvania.Annie Laurie Armstrong is the founder of Business Government Community Connections, a research and evaluation firm in Seattle.

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