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" ... worms seem to be the great promoters of vegetation, which would proceed but lamely without them, by boring, perforating, and loosening the soil, and rendering it pervious to rains and the fibres of plants, by drawing straws and stalks of leaves and... "
The Edinburgh Literary Journal: Or, Weekly Register of Criticism and Belles ... - Page 180
1829
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Animal Biography: Or, Authentic Anecdotes of the Lives, Manners ..., Volume 3

William Bingley - 1803 - 624 pages
...soil, and rendering it pervious to rains and the fibres of plants, by drawing straws and stalks of leaves and twigs into it ; and, most of all, by throwing up such infinite numbers of lumps called worm-casts, which form a fine manure * Lumbiicu* terrcstris. Linn. for grain and grass. Worms...
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Amphibious animals

William Bingley - 1805 - 622 pages
...it : and, most of all, by throwing up such infinite numbers of lumps called worm-casts, which form a fine manure for grain and grass. — Worms probably...where the rain washes the earth away ; and they affect slopes, probably to avoid being flooded. Gardeners and farmers express their detestation of worms;...
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Rural Sports, Volume 2

William Barker Daniel - 1812 - 654 pages
...Soil, and rendering it pervious to rains and the fibres of plants, by drawing straws and stalks of leaves and twigs into it ; and most of all, by throwing up such infinite numbers of earthy lumps, called Worm-casts, which being their excrement, is a fine manure for grain and grass....
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An Essay on the Philosophy, Study and Use of Natural History

Charles Fothergill - 1813 - 288 pages
...soil, and rendering it pervious to rains and the fibres of plants, by drawing straws and stalks of leaves and twigs into it; and, most of all, by throwing...excrement, is a fine manure for grain and grass." The utility of worms, indeed, really consists in fertilizing the earth, though they act also as correctors...
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Encyclopaedia Britannica; Or A Dictionary of Arts, Sciences, and ..., Volume 10

1823 - 872 pages
...soil, and rendering it pervious to rains and the fibres of plants, by drawing straws and stalks of leaves and twigs into it ; and most of all, by throwing up such infinite numbers of lumps called worm-casts, which form a fine manure for grain and grass. Worms probably provide new soil for...
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The Natural History of Reptiles and Serpents: To which is Added, an Appendix ...

1824 - 188 pages
...soil, 'and rendering it open to receive rain and the fibres of plants, by drawing 'straws and stalks of leaves and twigs into it ; and most of all, by throwing up such infinite numbers of lumps, called worm-casts, which form a tine manure for grass and corn ! Gardeners and farmers express their...
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The Natural History of Selborne

Gilbert White - 1829 - 364 pages
...soil, and rendering it pervious to rains and the fibres of plants, by drawing straws and stalks of leaves and twigs into it ; and, most of all, by throwing...up such infinite numbers of lumps of earth called worm- casts, which being their excrement, is a fine manure for grain and grass. Worms probably provide...
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The History of the County of Derby, Part 1

Stephen Glover - 1829 - 600 pages
...the soil, and rendering it pervious to rains, and the fibres of plants, by drawing straws, stalks of leaves and twigs into it ; and, most of all, by throwing up such an infinite number of lumps of earth called worm casts, which, being then- excrement, is a fine manure...
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The Quarterly Journal Of Agriculture

William Blackwood - 1831 - 986 pages
...soil, and rendering it pervious to rains and the fibres of plants, by drawing straws and stalks of leaves and twigs into it ; and, most of all, by throwing...where the rain washes the earth away ; and they affect slopes, probably to avoid being flooded. Gardeners and farmers express their detestation of worms ;...
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The history and gazetteer of the county of Derby

Stephen Glover - 1831 - 510 pages
...the soil, and rendering it pervious to rains, and the fibres of plants, by drawing straws, stalks of leaves and twigs into it ; and, most of all, by throwing up such an infinite number of lumps of earth, called worm casts, which, being their excrement, is a fine manure...
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