Sylvae; Or, the Second Part of Poetical Miscellanies

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General Books, 2013 - 62 pages
This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1702 edition. Excerpt: ... IV. See, Mighty Charles, how all the Minutes presei Each longing which shall first appear Since in this renowned Year, Not one but feels a secret happiness, As big with new events and some unheard success: See how our Troubles vanisti, see How the tumultuous Tribes agree. Propitious Winds bear all our Griefs away, And Peace clears up the Troubled Day. Not a Wrinkle, not a Scar Of Faction or dishonest War, But Pomps and Triumphs deck the Noble Kalendar A S O N G. By Mr. DRTDEN. STlvia the fair, in the bloom of Fifteen, Felt an innocent warmth, as (he lay on the Green Sh She had heard of a Pleasure, and something (he guest By the to wzing and tumbling & touching her Breast She saw the Men eager, but was at a loss, What they meant by their sighing, and kissing so closej By their praying and whining, And clasping, and twining, And panting and wishing, And sighing and kissing, And sighing and kissing so close, I J. Ah! she cry'd ah for a languishing Maid In a Country of Christians to die without aid! Not a Whig, or a Tory, or Trimmer at least, Or a Protestant Parson, or Catholick Priest, To instruct a young Virgin, that is at a loss, What they meant by their sighing, and kissingso close! By their praying and whining, And clasping and twining, And panting and wishing, And sighing and kissing. And sighing and kissingso close. III. Cupid in Shape of a Swain did appear, He saw the sad Wound, and in pity drew near, L 3 Then Then show'd her his Arrow, and bid her not fear, For the Pain was no more than a Maiden may bear; When the Balm was infos'd me was not at a loss. What they meant by their sighing, and killing so close By their praying and whining, And clasping and twining, And panting and wishing, And sighing and kissing, And sighing and kissing..

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About the author (2013)

Born August 9, 1631 into a wealthy Puritan family, John Dryden received an excellent education at Westminster School and Cambridge University. After a brief period in government, he turned his attention almost entirely to writing. Dryden was one of the first English writers to make his living strictly by writing, but this meant he had to cater to popular taste. His long career was astonishingly varied, and he turned his exceptional talents to almost all literary forms. Dryden dominated the entire Restoration period as a poet, playwright, and all-round man of letters. He was the third poet laureate of England. In his old age Dryden was virtually a literary "dictator" in England, with an immense influence on eighteenth-century poetry. His verse form and his brilliant satires became models for other poets, but they could rarely equal his standard. Dryden was also a master of "occasional" poetry - verse written for a specific person or special occasion. Like most poets of his time, Dryden saw poetry as a way of expressing ideas rather than emotions, which makes his poetry seem cool and impersonal to some modern readers. Dryden also wrote numerous plays that helped him make him one of the leading figures in the Restoration theatre. Today, however he is admired more for his influence on other writers than for his own works. He died on April 30, 1700 in London.

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