Family Life and School Achievement: Why Poor Black Children Succeed or Fail

Front Cover
University of Chicago Press, 2015 M07 31 - 264 pages
1 Review
Reviews aren't verified, but Google checks for and removes fake content when it's identified
Working mothers, broken homes, poverty, racial or ethnic background, poorly educated parents—these are the usual reasons given for the academic problems of poor urban children. Reginald M. Clark contends, however, that such structural characteristics of families neither predict nor explain the wide variation in academic achievement among children. He emphasizes instead the total family life, stating that the most important indicators of academic potential are embedded in family culture.

To support his contentions, Clark offers ten intimate portraits of Black families in Chicago. Visiting the homes of poor one- and two-parent families of high and low achievers, Clark made detailed observations on the quality of home life, noting how family habits and interactions affect school success and what characteristics of family life provide children with "school survival skills," a complex of behaviors, attitudes, and knowledge that are the essential elements in academic success.

Clark's conclusions lead to exciting implications for educational policy. If school achievement is not dependent on family structure or income, parents can learn to inculcate school survival skills in their children. Clark offers specific suggestions and strategies for use by teachers, parents, school administrators, and social service policy makers, but his work will also find an audience in urban anthropology, family studies, and Black studies.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

Reviews aren't verified, but Google checks for and removes fake content when it's identified
User Review - Flag as inappropriate

I can't speak to any racial topics or purport to the families or communities in this book, but its message that success relies on parent/caretaker/etc. disposition, attitude, and approach to social communication in the home is important. The author argues, implicitly, that speaking with respect and not yelling, etc. are more critical factors than two-parent households, and other structural factors.  

Contents

1 The Issue
1
2 Research Methods
16
3 The Family Life of High Achievers in TwoParent Homes
26
4 The Family Life of High Achievers in OneParent Homes
61
5 An Analysis of Dispositions and LifeStyles in High Achievers Homes
111
6 The Family Life of Low Achievers in Two Parent Homes
143
7 The Family Life of Low Achievers in OneParent Homes
171
8 An Analysis of Dispositions and LifeStyles in Low Achievers Homes
190
9 The Family and the Bases for Academic Achievement
197
10 Families and Futures
209
Notes
217
Bibliography
229
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Bibliographic information