The Complete Poems of Robert Herrick, Volume 1

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Chatto and Windus, 1876
 

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Page ccxxii - TO DAFFODILS FAIR Daffodils, we weep to see You haste away so soon : As yet the early-rising Sun Has not attain'd his noon. Stay, stay, Until the hasting day Has run But to the even-song ; And, having pray'd together, we Will go with you along. We have short time to stay, as you, We have as short a Spring ; As quick a growth to meet decay As you, or any thing. We die, As your hours do, and dry Away Like to the Summer's rain ; Or as the pearls of morning's dew Ne'er to be found again.
Page 111 - And as a vapour or a drop of rain Once lost, can ne'er be found again; So when or you or I are made A fable, song, or fleeting shade, All love, all liking, all delight Lies drowned with us in endless night.
Page lxiii - What things have we seen Done at the Mermaid ! Heard words that have been So nimble, and so full of subtle flame, As if that every one from whence they came Had meant to put his whole wit in a jest And had resolved to live a fool the rest Of his dull life ; then when there hath been thrown Wit able enough to justify the town For three days past ; wit that might warrant be For the whole City to talk foolishly Till that were cancell'd ; and when that was gone, We left an air behind us, which alone...
Page ccxvi - Her feet beneath her petticoat, Like little mice stole in and out, As if they feared the light. But oh ! she dances such a way, No sun upon an Easter day Is half so fine a sight.
Page ccxxiv - E'en death to die for thee. Thou art my life, my love, my heart, The very eyes of me: And hast command of every part, To live and die for thee.
Page 110 - And some have wept and woo'd, and plighted troth, And chose their priest, ere we can cast off sloth : Many a green-gown has been given, Many a kiss, both odd and even : Many a glance, too, has been sent From out the eye, love's firmament...
Page ccxlv - Grace for a Child. HERE a little child I stand. Heaving up my either hand ; Cold as paddocks though they be, Here I lift them up to Thee, For a benison to fall On our meat and on us all. Amen.
Page ccxxiii - Or bid me love, and I will give A loving heart to thee. A heart as soft, a heart as kind, A heart as sound and free As in the whole world thou canst find, That heart I'll give to thee.
Page 167 - Lords of Wine and Oile : By whose tough labours, and rough hands, We rip up first, then reap our lands. Crown'd with the eares of corne, now come, And, to the Pipe, sing Harvest home.
Page ccxxviii - To LIVE MERRILY, AND TO TRUST TO GOOD VERSES. Now is the time for mirth, Nor cheek, or tongue be dumbe : For with the flowrie earth, The golden pomp is come.

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