The Browning Cyclopædia: A Guide to the Study of the Works of Robert Browning ; with Copious Explanatory Notes and References on All Difficult Passages

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S. Sonnenschein, 1892 - 572 pages
 

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Page 124 - I said in mine heart, Go to now, I will prove thee with mirth, therefore enjoy pleasure : and, behold, this also is vanity.
Page 473 - For as many as are of the works of the law, are under the curse : for it is written, Cursed is every one that continueth not in all things which are written in the book of the law to do them.
Page 309 - I SAID, I will take heed to my ways, that I sin not with my tongue : I will keep my mouth with a bridle, while the wicked is before me.
Page 234 - I say, the acknowledgment of God in Christ Accepted by thy reason, solves for thee All questions in the earth and out of it, And has so far advanced thee to be wise.
Page 92 - Others apart sat on a hill retired, In thoughts more elevate, and reasoned high Of providence, foreknowledge, will, and fate, Fixed fate, free will, foreknowledge absolute, And found no end, in wandering mazes lost...
Page 302 - My own hope is, a sun will pierce The thickest cloud earth ever stretched ; That, after Last, returns the First, Though a wide compass round be fetched ; That what began best, can't end worst, Nor what God blessed once, prove accurst.
Page 234 - The very God ! think, Abib ; dost thou think? So, the All-Great, were the All-Loving too — So, through the thunder comes a human voice Saying, 'O heart I made, a heart beats here ! Face, my hands fashioned, see it in myself. Thou hast no power nor may'st conceive of mine, But love I gave thee, with Myself to love, 310 And thou must love me who have died for thee !' The madman saith He said so : it is strange.
Page 300 - He, gifted like the objective poet with the fuller perception of nature and man, is impelled to embody the thing he perceives, not so much with reference to the many below as to the one above him, the supreme Intelligence which apprehends all things in their absolute truth, — an ultimate view ever aspired to, if but partially attained, by the poet's own soul.
Page 234 - A Face like my face that receives thee; a Man like to me, "Thou shalt love and be loved by, for ever: a Hand like this hand "Shall throw open the gates of new life to thee! See the Christ stand!
Page 351 - All service ranks the same with God — With God, whose puppets, best and worst, Are we ; there is no last nor first.

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