Narrative of a Forced Journey Through Spain and France: As a Prisoner of War, in the Years 1810-1814, Volume 2

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E. Kerby, 1814 - 495 pages
 

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Page 31 - One man draws out the wire, another straights it, a third cuts it, a fourth points it, a fifth grinds it at the top for receiving the head; to make the head requires two or three distinct operations; to put it on is a peculiar business; to whiten the pins is another; it is even a trade by itself to put them into the paper; and the important business of making a pin is, in this manner, divided into about eighteen distinct operations, which in some manufactories are all performed by distinct hands,...
Page 30 - ... could scarce, perhaps, with his utmost industry make one pin in a day, and certainly could not make twenty. But in the way in which this business is now carried on, not only the whole work is a peculiar trade, but it is divided into a number of branches, of which the greater part are likewise peculiar trades.
Page 31 - ... the important business of making a pin is, in this manner, divided into about eighteen distinct operations, which, in some manufactories, are all performed by distinct hands, though in others the same man will sometimes perform two or three of them.
Page 30 - ... has probably given occasion), could scarce, perhaps, with his utmost industry, make one pin in a day, and certainly could not make twenty. But in the way in which this business is now carried on, not only the whole work is a peculiar trade, but it is divided...
Page 329 - Good name in man and woman, dear my lord, Is the immediate jewel of their souls : Who steals my purse, steals trash ; 'tis something, nothing ; 'Twas mine, 'tis his, and has been slave to thousands : But he that filches from me my good name Robs me of that which not enriches him, And makes me poor indeed, Oth.
Page 47 - FAngloise; that is, to give the fish and vegetables as part of the first course. Her obstinacy so put me out of temper, that, to her great astonishment and mortification, I threw the whole of her first course, consisting entirely of French [dishes, out of the window, dishes included ; and, ordering up the second, we made a tolerable dinner off it.
Page 412 - Our imaginations, from having been bound up to the highest pitch of conjecture and anxiety, to devise a cause for such strange occurrences, were soon set at rest by a most violent rapping at the door, which proved to be an express that brought us the agreeable and wonderful intelligence of Napoleon's abdicating the throne, and the extraordinary change such an event has since created on the civil and political system of the world.
Page 411 - ... were abundance in the neighbourhood, made a hideous noise, and appearances were altogether so strange, that I observed there must either have been an earthquake, or some most extraordinary event had taken place. Our imaginations, from being wound up to the highest pitch of conjecture and anxiety...
Page 117 - The bas-reliefs of the shaft pursue a spiral direction from the base to the capital, and display in chronological order the principal actions of the campaign, from the departure of the troops from Boulogne to the battle of Austerlitz. The figures are three feet high ; their number is said to be two thousand, and the length of the spiral band eight hundred and forty feet.
Page 412 - While drinking our wine after dinner, three of the wine-glasses broke spontaneously in pieces, and the wine ran about the table and on the floor. The clock, which before had struck tolerably correct, now struck two hundred and sixteen. The screech-owls, of which there were abundance in the neighbourhood, made a hideous noise, and appearances...

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