The Catholic Tradition in English Literature

Front Cover
George Carver
Doubleday, Page, 1926 - 467 pages
An anthology of Catholic literature in English, from Chaucer to Joyce Kilmer. Much of it is poetry. Also includes drama, biography and autobiography, treatises, fiction, and essays.
 

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Page 161 - Hope humbly then; with trembling pinions soar; Wait the great teacher Death; and God adore. What future bliss, he gives not thee to know, But gives that Hope to be thy blessing now.
Page 161 - Where slaves once more their native land behold, No fiends torment, no Christians thirst for gold. To Be, contents his natural desire, He asks no Angel's wing, no Seraph's fire; But thinks, admitted to that equal sky, His faithful dog shall bear him company.
Page 81 - My faultless breast the furnace is, the fuel wounding thorns; Love is the fire, and sighs the smoke, the ashes shame and scorns; The fuel justice layeth on, and mercy blows the coals; The metal in this furnace wrought are men's defiled souls: For which, as now on fire I am to work them to their good, So will I melt into a bath to wash them in my blood.
Page 92 - Some men with swords may reap the field, And plant fresh laurels where they kill; But their strong nerves at last must yield; They tame but one another still: Early or late, They stoop to fate, And must give up their murmuring breath, When they, pale captives, creep to death.
Page 161 - Lo, the poor Indian ! whose untutor'd mind Sees God in clouds, or hears him in the wind; His soul, proud science never taught to stray Far as the solar walk, or milky way...
Page 228 - What boots it at one gate to make defence, And at another to let in the foe...
Page 157 - The world recedes; it disappears! Heaven opens on my eyes! my ears With sounds seraphic ring: Lend, lend your wings! I mount! I fly! O Grave! where is thy victory? O Death! where is thy sting?
Page 147 - From harmony, from heavenly harmony This universal frame began : From harmony to harmony Through all the compass of the notes it ran, The diapason closing full in Man.
Page 151 - The Saviour comes ! by ancient bards foretold: Hear him, ye deaf ! and all ye blind, behold ! He from thick films shall purge the visual ray, And on the sightless eye-ball pour the day : 'Tis he th' obstructed paths of sound shall clear, And bid new music charm th' unfolding ear : The dumb shall sing, the lame his crutch forego, And leap exulting like the bounding roe.
Page 61 - Everyman, I will go with thee, and be thy guide, In thy most need to go by thy side.

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