On Charisma and Institution Building

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University of Chicago Press, 1968 M12 15 - 313 pages
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This selection from Max Weber's writings presents his variegated work from one central focus, the relationship between charisma on the one hand, and the process of institution building in the major fields of the social order such as politics, law, economy, and culture and religion on the other. That the concept of charisma is crucially important for understanding the processes of institution building is implicit in Weber's own writings, and the explication of this relationship is perhaps the most important challenge which Weber's work poses for modern sociology.

Max Weber on Charisma and Institution Building is a volume in "The Heritage of Sociology," a series edited by Morris Janowitz. Other volumes deal with the writings of George Herbert Mead, William F. Ogburn, Louis Wirth, W. I. Thomas, Robert E. Park, and the Scottish Moralists—Adam Smith, David Hume, Adam Ferguson, and others.
 

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Contents

General Definitions of Social Action
3
The Concept of Legitimate Order
11
The Sociology of Charismatic Authority
18
Meaning of Discipline
28
The Pure Types of Legitimate Authority
46
Bureaucracy
66
Formal and Substantive Rationalization
81
Natural Law
95
Caste StratificationThe Case of India
183
Social Stratification and Class Structure
201
The Prussian Junkers
209
General Characteristics of the City
225
The Concept of Citizenship
239
The Prophet
253
The Different Roads to Salvation
268
Asceticism Mysticism and Salvation Religion
279

Modern Law
107
Premodern Capitalism
129
Modern Capitalism
140
Webers Basic Concepts of Stratification
169
Science as a Vocation
294
BIBLIOGRAPHY
311
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About the author (1968)

Max Weber, a German political economist, legal historian, and sociologist, had an impact on the social sciences that is difficult to overestimate. According to a widely held view, he was the founder of the modern way of conceptualizing society and thus the modern social sciences. His major interest was the process of rationalization, which characterizes Western civilization---what he called the "demystification of the world." This interest led him to examine the three types of domination or authority that characterize hierarchical relationships: charismatic, traditional, and legal. It also led him to the study of bureaucracy; all of the world's major religions; and capitalism, which he viewed as a productof the Protestant ethic. With his contemporary, the French sociologist Emile Durkheim---they seem not to have known each other's work---he created modern sociology.

S. N. Eisenstadt is emeritus professor at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. His previous books include Multiple Modernities, Explorations in Jewish Historical Experience, and Power, Trust and Meaning.

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