Nineteenth Century and After: A Monthly Review, Volume 11

Front Cover
Nineteenth Century and After Limited., 1882
 

Contents

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 472 - This royal throne of kings, this scepter'd isle, This earth of majesty, this seat of Mars, This other Eden, demi-paradise ; This fortress built by Nature for herself Against infection and the hand of war ; This happy breed of men, this little world, This precious stone set in the silver sea, Which serves it in the office of a wall, Or as a moat defensive to a house, S Against the envy of less happier lands ; This blessed plot, this earth, this realm, this England...
Page 472 - Which serves it in the office of a wall Or as a moat defensive to a house, Against the envy of less happier lands; This blessed plot, this earth, this realm, this England, This nurse, this teeming womb of royal kings, Fear'd by their breed and famous by their birth, Renowned for their deeds as far from home For Christian service and true chivalry, As is the sepulchre in stubborn Jewry Of the world's ransom, blessed Mary's Son : This land of such dear souls, this dear, dear land, Dear for her reputation...
Page 797 - O Romeo, Romeo ! wherefore art thou Romeo ? Deny thy father and refuse thy name; Or, if thou wilt not, be but sworn my love, And I'll no longer be a Capulet.
Page 122 - Party is a body of men united, for promoting by their joint endeavours the national interest, upon some particular principle in which they are all agreed.
Page 472 - This land of such dear souls, this dear dear land, Dear for her reputation through the world, Is now leased out, I die pronouncing it, Like to a tenement or pelting farm : England, bound in with the triumphant sea, Whose rocky shore beats back the envious siege Of watery Neptune, is now bound in with shame, With inky blots and rotten parchment bonds : That England, that was wont to conquer others, Hath made a shameful conquest of itself.
Page 263 - The best that can be said of them is, that they are befooled by their own fancies, and the victims of distempered brains and ill habits of body.
Page 65 - To dream and dream, like yonder amber light, Which will not leave the myrrh-bush on the height; To hear each other's whisper'd speech; Eating the Lotos day by day, To watch the crisping ripples on the beach, And tender curving lines of creamy spray; To lend our hearts and spirits wholly To the influence of mild-minded melancholy...
Page 182 - I blow the bellows, I forge the steel, In all the shops of trade ; I hammer the ore, and turn the wheel, Where my arms of strength are made ; I manage the furnace, the mill, the mint ; I carry, I spin, I weave ; And all my doings I put into print On every Saturday eve. I've no muscle to weary, no breast to decay, No bones to be "laid on the shelf," And soon I intend you "may go and play," While I manage the world by myself.
Page 281 - ANOTHER year ! — another deadly blow ! Another mighty Empire overthrown ! And We are left, or shall be left, alone ; The last that dare to struggle with the Foe. 'Tis well ! from this day forward we shall know That in ourselves our safety must be sought ; That by our own right hands it must be wrought ; That we must stand unpropped, or be laid low.
Page 629 - Chaldeans, and soothsayers ; forasmuch as an excellent spirit, and knowledge, and understanding, interpreting of dreams, and showing of hard sentences, and dissolving of doubts, were found in the same Daniel, whom the king named Belteshazzar : now let Daniel be called, and he will show the interpretation.

Bibliographic information