Revolutionary Change

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Stanford University Press, 1982 - 217 pages
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A classic study by a leading theorist of revolution, Revolutionary Change has gone through eleven printings since its appearance in 1966 and been translated into German, French, and Korean. This carefully revised edition not only brings the original analysis up to date but adds two entirely new chapters: one on terrorism, the most celebrated form of political violence throughout the 1970s, and one on theories of revolution from Brinton to the present day.

 

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This book is phenomenal. The breadth and depth of understanding presented by Chalmers in this book is astonishing. Before reading this book, I had given little thought to such subjects as revolution, societies and why they persist, and violence within a society. Now that I've read even just some of this book it has completely opened me up to this world of thought.
This book is not an easy read. You will need to spend some time reading and re-reading parts to fully understand their intent and meaning. I spent around two hours reading a twenty page chapter. I'm a slow reader but I like to understand what I'm reading.
The words presented aren't usually technical and can be understood within their context.
I would recommend this book to anyone in political sciences or someone who is just looking to learn about societies and revolution. People who like to think are also highly recommended to read.
 

Contents

The Implications
1
Coercion
16
Structure
41
The Disequilibrated Social System
61
Revolution
91
Varieties of Revolution
122
Strategies of Revolution
136
Terrorism
152
Theories of Revolution
169
Copyright

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About the author (1982)

Chalmers Johnson, president of the Japan Policy Research Institute & professor emeritus at the University of California, San Diego, has written numerous books on Japan & Asia including his classic "Miti & the Japanese Miracle" & "Japan: Who Governs?" He lives near San Diego.

Bibliographic information