Remains in Verse and Prose of Arthur Henry Hallam

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John Murray, 1862 - 305 pages
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Page 260 - Cosi disse il Maestro ; ed egli stessi Mi volse, e non si tenne alle mie mani, Che con le sue ancor non mi chiudessi. 60 O voi, ch' avete gl' intelletti sani, Mirate la dottrina che s' asconde Sotto il velame degli versi strani.
Page 236 - E s' io al vero son timido amico , Temo di perder vita tra coloro Che questo tempo chiameranno antico. La luce in che rideva il mio tesoro Ch' io trovai lì , si fe' prima corrusca, Quale a raggio di sole specchio d' oro ; Indi rispose : coscienza fusca O della propria o dell...
Page 88 - The garden trees are busy with the shower That fell ere sunset : now methinks they talk, Lowly and sweetly as befits the hour, One to another down the grassy walk. Hark the laburnum from his opening flower, This...
Page 5 - Thorough th' impenetrable gloom to fix That master light, the secret truth of things, Which is the body of the infinite God...
Page 279 - ... down the spirit of the universe to our narrow round of earth were as nothing in comparison to this golden chain of suffering and self-sacrifice, which at once riveted the heart of man to one who, like himself, was acquainted with grief. Pain is the deepest thing we have in our nature, and union through pain has always seemed more real and more holy than any other.1 There is a sad pleasure — non ingrata amaritudo — and a sort of meditative tenderness in contemplating the little life of this...
Page 43 - I coveted that Abbey's doom ; For if I thought the early flowers Of our affection may not bloom, Like those green hills through countless hours, Grant me at least a tardy waning, Some pleasure still in age's paining; Though lines and forms must fade away, Still may old Beauty share the empire of Decay...
Page 302 - Ferdusi or Calidasa. We have remarked five distinctive excellencies of his own manner. First his luxuriance of imagination, and at the same time his control over it. Secondly, his power of embodying himself in ideal characters, or rather...
Page 275 - God ; the single being to whom a great revelation had been made, and over whose head an ' exceeding weight of glory ' was suspended. For him the rocks of Horeb had trembled, and the waters of the Red Sea were parted in their course. The word given on Sinai with such solemn pomp of ministration was given to his own individual soul, and brought him into immediate communion with his Creator. That awful Being could never be put away from him. He was about his path, and about his bed, and knew all his...
Page 300 - Those different powers of poetic disposition, the energies of Sensitive, of Reflective, of Passionate Emotion, which in former times were intermingled, and derived from mutual support an extensive empire over the feelings of men, were now restrained within separate spheres of agency.
Page 85 - Lady, I bid thee to a sunny dome, Ringing with echoes of Italian song ; Henceforth to thee these magic halls belong, And all the pleasant place is like a home: Hark ! on the right, with full piano tone, Old Dante's voice encircles all the air: Hark yet again ! like flute tones mingling rare Comes the keen sweetness of Petrarca's moan.

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