Children of the State: The Training of Juvenile Paupers

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Macmillan and Company, 1868 - 275 pages
 

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Page 245 - All great establishments in the nature of boarding schools, where the sexes must be separated; where there must be boarding in common, and sleeping in congregate dormitories; where there must be routine, and formality, and restraint, and repression of individuality; where the charms and refining influences of the true family relation cannot be had, — all such institutions are unnatural, undesirable, and very liable to abuse. We should have as few of them as is possible, and those few should be...
Page 246 - Beware how you needlessly sever any of those ties of family, of friendship, of neighborhood, during the period of their strongest growth, lest you make a homeless man, a wanderer and a stranger. Especially beware how you cause him to neglect forming early relations of affection with those whose sympathy and friendship will be most important to him during life...
Page 117 - Protestants of very humble position, nn orphanage for the fatherless of their own faith. Twenty-four destitute orphans were selected as the first recipients of its bounty, and a plan was adopted for training its wards which has ever since been pursued. No vast and imposing building was erected, swallowing up the funds of the institution, and agglomerating the children in unnatural masses ; but the orphans were sent into the country to board, in the families of respectable Protestants, usually laborers...
Page 129 - ... and deeply moved by the destitute condition of his children, three humble tradesmen devised the Protestant Orphan Society. A suitable inscription on the tombstone placed in memory of the orphans first buried there records the origin of the association. It has indeed become a mighty tree from so small a seed ! The provincial branches, as we learn from the annual report issued in March, 1866, have increased to thirty. They have 2,208 orphans under their care, and have placed out in the world 5,376;...
Page 26 - The case of the Girls is far worse than the Boys,. as all the conditions of workhouse management fall with peculiar evil on their natures. To mass boys together in large numbers, with no home influence or habits, and no attempt to draw out their affections, is dangerous. To do the same to girls, isfatal. .Among all the endless paradoxes of female treatment, one of the worst and most absurd is that which, while eternally proclaiming "home...
Page 158 - They are boarded with cottagers, farm servants, or tradespeople, and not with persons who make the care of them their only task. "Preference is given to people of character who have a steady income apart from the allowance for the board of the children, and who will receive and treat them exactly as members of their own family; and it is found that when the children are sent out young, they learn to call the parties to whom they are sent father and mother.
Page 160 - Our children are, consequently, the most regular in their attendance; are generally the best scholars, carrying off a large share of the school prizes; and when sent to service prove as good servants as the children of the cottagers or workpeople not dependent on the rates usually do — certainly not inferior, and many of them rise to positions of trust. It is a rare thing for either a boy or a girl, who has been brought up by the Parochial Board in this way, to become chargeable to the parish in...
Page 147 - FRANCE. wise, a small silver medal, bearing on one side the head of St. Vincent de Paul, on the other the child's number, is fixed round his neck, never to be removed until he is six years old, except in extreme cases, and -with legal formalities ; he is then entrusted to a nurse residing in the country, a sufficient supply of whom are constantly brought to Paris, under the escort of a surveillante, to fetch their foster children. These are likewise placed under the close supervision of a medical...

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