Slavery: Letters and Speeches

Front Cover
B. B. Mussey & Company, 1851 - 564 pages
Tharp collection.
 

Contents

I
xiii
II
8
III
82
V
117
VII
119
IX
178
X
234
XI
280
XII
336
XIV
338
XV
355
XVII
388
XVIII
471
XX
521
XXII
534

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Page 393 - And they were the more fierce, saying, He stirreth up the people, teaching, throughout all Jewry, beginning from Galilee to this place.
Page 122 - A voice is heard in Ramah, weeping and great mourning, Rachel weeping for her children and refusing to be comforted, because they are no more.
Page 263 - Third, new States of convenient size, not exceeding four in number, in addition to said State of Texas, and having sufficient population, may hereafter, by the consent of said State, be formed out of the territory thereof, which shall be entitled to admission under the provisions of the Federal Constitution.
Page 155 - That, in addition to the provisions of the third paragraph of the second section of the fourth article of the Constitution of the United States...
Page 492 - ... mentioned, shall be conclusive of the right of the person or persons in whose favor granted, to remove such fugitive to the State or Territory from which he escaped, and shall prevent all molestation of such person or persons by any process issued by any court, judge, magistrate, or other person whomsoever.
Page 197 - We, the people of the United States, in order to form a more perfect Union, .... do ordain and establish this Constitution for the United States of America.
Page 263 - States as may be formed out of that portion of said territory lying south of thirty-six degrees thirty minutes north latitude, commonly known as the Missouri compromise line, shall be admitted into the Union, with or without slavery, as the people of each State asking admission may desire. And in such State or States as shall be formed out of said territory, north of said Missouri compromise line, slavery or involuntary servitude, (except for crime,) shall be prohibited.
Page 113 - Tis thou, thrice sweet and gracious goddess, addressing myself to LIBERTY, whom all in public or in private worship, whose taste is grateful, and ever will be so, till NATURE herself shall change no tint of words can spot thy snowy mantle...
Page 290 - That in controversies respecting property, and in suits between man and man, the ancient trial by jury is preferable to any other, and ought to be held sacred.
Page 297 - What is a suit? We understand it to be the prosecution, or pursuit, of some claim, demand, or request. In law language, it is the prosecution of some demand in a court of justice. The remedy for every species of wrong is, says Judge Blackstone, "the being put in possession of that right whereof the party injured is deprived.

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