Judgment, Imagination, and Politics: Themes from Kant and Arendt

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Ronald Beiner, Jennifer Nedelsky
Rowman & Littlefield, 2001 - 319 pages
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Judgment, Imagination, and Politics brings together for the first time leading essays on the nature of judgment. Drawing from themes in Kant's Critique of Judgment and Hannah Arendt's discussion of judgment from Lectures on Kant's Political Philosophy, these essays deal with: the role of imagination in judgment; judgment as a distinct human faculty; the nature of judgment in law and politics; and the many puzzles that arise from the 'enlarged mentality, ' the capacity to consider the perspectives of others that aren't in Kant treated as essential to judgment
 

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Contents

The Crisis in Culture Its Social and Its Political Significance
3
Aesthetic Problems of Modern Philosophy
27
Moral Judgment
47
The Public Use of Reason
65
Rereading Hannah Arendts Kant Lectures
91
Judgment Diversity and Relational Autonomy
103
The Judgment of Arendt
121
Judging Human Action Arendts Appropriation of Kant
139
Judgment and the Moral Foundations of Politics in Hannah Arendts Thought
183
Asymmetrical Reciprocity On Moral Respect Wonder and Enlarged Thought
205
Embodied Diversity and the Challenges to Law
229
When Actor and Spectator Meet in the Courtroom Reflections on Hannah Arendts Concept of Judgment
257
Hannah Arendt Modernity Alienation and Critique
287
Index
311
About the Contributors
317
Copyright

Hannah Arendt on Judgment The Unwritten Doctrine of Reason
165

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About the author (2001)

Ronald Beiner is professor of political science at the University of Toronto. Jennifer Nedelsky is professor of political science and women's studies at the University of Toronto.

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