The Divine Comedy of Dante Alighieri: Hell, Purgatory, Paradise

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P.F. Collier, 1909 - 429 pages
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This work is a story of a man (the author) being shown through Hell, Purgatory, and finally Paradise, and is told in the form a narrative poems broken up into "Cantos". Considered one of the great classics of all times, these fictional travels take place on Good Friday evening through Easter Sunday, ca. 1300 (the classic Tridium of the Catholic Church and the most important part of the religious year).
 

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English translation of a poem that is widely considered the central epic poem of Italian literature, and one of the greatest works of literature in the world. -Elisabetta

Contents

I
5
II
9
III
13
IV
16
V
21
VI
25
VII
28
VIII
32
LII
210
LIII
214
LIV
219
LV
224
LVI
228
LVII
232
LVIII
236
LIX
240

IX
36
X
40
XI
45
XII
48
XIII
53
XIV
57
XV
61
XVI
65
XVII
69
XVIII
73
XIX
77
XX
81
XXI
85
XXII
89
XXIII
93
XXIV
98
XXV
102
XXVI
103
XXVII
104
XXVIII
108
XXIX
113
XXX
117
XXXI
121
XXXII
125
XXXIII
129
XXXIV
134
XXXV
139
XXXVI
143
XXXVII
147
XXXVIII
151
XXXIX
155
XL
159
XLI
164
XLII
169
XLIII
173
XLIV
177
XLV
180
XLVI
185
XLVII
188
XLVIII
193
XLIX
198
L
202
LI
206
LX
244
LXI
248
LXII
252
LXIII
256
LXIV
261
LXV
265
LXVI
269
LXVII
273
LXVIII
277
LXIX
281
LXX
285
LXXI
289
LXXII
293
LXXIII
297
LXXIV
302
LXXV
306
LXXVI
311
LXXVII
316
LXXVIII
321
LXXIX
324
LXXX
329
LXXXI
334
LXXXII
337
LXXXIII
342
LXXXIV
347
LXXXV
351
LXXXVI
355
LXXXVII
358
LXXXVIII
362
LXXXIX
366
XC
371
XCI
375
XCII
379
XCIII
383
XCIV
387
XCV
391
XCVI
395
XCVII
399
XCVIII
403
XCIX
407
C
411
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Page 22 - Alas ! by what sweet thoughts, what fond desire Must they at length to that ill pass have reached!" Then turning, I to them my speech addressed, And thus began : " Francesca ! your sad fate Even to tears my grief and pity moves. But tell me ; in the time of your sweet sighs, By what, and how Love granted, that ye knew Your yet uncertain wishes ?" She replied : " No greater grief than to remember days Of joy, when misery is at hand.
Page 255 - And I looked, and, behold, a whirlwind came out of the north, a great cloud, and a fire infolding itself, and a brightness was about it, and out of the midst thereof as the colour of amber, out of the midst of the fire.
Page 255 - Also out of the midst thereof came the likeness of four living creatures. And this was their appearance ; they had the likeness of a man.
Page 406 - In that abyss Of radiance, clear and lofty, seem'd, methought, Three orbs of triple hue, dipt in one bound :* And, from another, one reflected seem'd, As rainbow is from rainbow: and the third Seem'd fire, breathed equally from both. O speech ! How feeble and how faint art thou, to give Conception birth.
Page 11 - Through me you pass into eternal pain: Through me among the people lost for aye. Justice the founder of my fabric moved: To rear me was the task of power divine, Supremest wisdom, and primeval love.1 Before me things create were none, save things Eternal, and eternal I endure. All hope abandon, ye who enter here.
Page 3 - In the midway of this our mortal life, I found me in a gloomy wood, astray Gone from the path direct: and e'en to tell, It were no easy task, how savage wild That forest, how robust and rough its growth, 5 Which to remember only, my dismay Renews, in bitterness not far from death.
Page 11 - Here sighs, with lamentations and loud moans, Resounded through the air pierced by no star, That e'en I wept at entering. Various tongues, Horrible languages, outcries of woe, Accents of anger, voices deep and hoarse, With hands together smote that swell'd the sounds, Made up a tumult, that for ever whirls Round through that air with solid darkness stain'd, Like to the sand that in the whirlwind flies.
Page 218 - Enters Alagna; in his Vicar Christ Himself a captive, and his mockery Acted again. Lo! to his holy lip The vinegar and gall once more applied ; And he 'twixt living robbers doom'd to bleed. Lo ! the new Pilate, of whose cruelty Such violence cannot fill the measure up, With no decree to sanction, pushes on Into the temple1* his yet eager sails.
Page 67 - Thus me my guide address'd, And beckon'd him, that he should come to shore, Near to the stony causeway's utmost edge. Forthwith that image vile of Fraud appear'd. His head and upper part exposed on land, But laid not on the shore his bestial train.
Page 201 - Was wont to boast two suns,' whose several beams Cast light on either way, the world's and God's. One since hath quench'd the other; and the sword Is grafted on the crook; and, so conjoin'd, Each must perforce decline to worse, unawed By fear of other.

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