Portrait of American Jews: The Last Half of the Twentieth Century

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University of Washington Press, 1995 - 190 pages
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Has America been a place that has preserved and protected Jewish life? Is it a place in which a Jewish future is ensured? Samuel Heilman, long-time observer of American Jewish life, grapples with these questions from a sociologist’s perspective. He argues that the same conditions that have allowed Jews to live in relative security since the 1950s have also presented them with a greater challenge than did the adversity and upheaval of earlier years.
 

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Contents

Prologue
3
Starting Over Acculturation and Suburbia the Jews of the 1950s
8
The Emergence of Two Types of Jews Choices Made in the 1960s and 1970s
47
Quality versus Quantity The Challenge of the 1980s and 1990s
101
Notes
165
Index
187
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About the author (1995)

Myrna Goldenberg is professor emerita, Montgomery College, Maryland, founding director of the Paul Peck Humanities Institute at Montgomery, and adjunct professor at the University of Maryland and Johns Hopkins University. Rochelle L. Millen is professor of religion at Wittenberg University, Springfield, Ohio. Other contributors include Beth Hawkins Benedix, Timothy A. Bennett, David R. Blumenthal, Stephen Feinstein, Donald Felipe, Leonard Grob, Marilyn J. Harran, Henry F. Knight, Paul A. Levine, Juergen Manemann, Rachel Rapperport Munn, Tam Parker, David Patterson, Didier Pollefeyt, Amy Shapiro, Stephen D. Smith, Laurinda Stryker, and Mary Todd.

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