Studies in Virgil

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E. Arnold, 1904 - 312 pages
Critical analysis of Vergil's life and works.
 

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Page 62 - Never from lips of cunning fell The thrilling Delphic oracle; Out from the heart of nature rolled The burdens of the Bible old; The litanies of nations came, Like the volcano's tongue of flame, Up from the burning core below, The canticles of love and woe...
Page 213 - Who, doomed to go in company with Pain, And Fear, and Bloodshed, miserable train! Turns his necessity to glorious gain; In face of these doth exercise a power Which is our human nature's highest dower; Controls them and subdues, transmutes, bereaves Of their bad influence, and their good receives...
Page 303 - For oft, when on my couch I lie In vacant or in pensive mood, They flash upon that inward eye Which is the bliss of solitude; And then my heart with pleasure fills, And dances with the daffodils.
Page 97 - They say the Lion and the Lizard keep The Courts where Jamshyd gloried and drank deep: And Bahrain that great Hunter — the Wild Ass Stamps o'er his Head, but cannot break his Sleep.
Page 166 - And my poor fool is hang'd! No, no, no life! Why should a dog, a horse, a rat, have life, And thou no breath at all? Thou'lt come no more, Never, never, never, never, never! Pray you undo this button. Thank you, sir. Do you see this? Look on her! look! her lips! Look there, look there!
Page 182 - Talibus Ilioneus : cuncti simul ore fremebant Dardanidae. 560 Tum breviter Dido, vultum demissa, profatur : Solvite corde metum, Teucri ; secludite curas. Res dura et regni novitas me talia cogunt Moliri, et late fines custode tueri.
Page 211 - Excudent alii spirantia mollius aera, credo equidem, vivos ducent de marmore vultus, orabunt causas melius, caelique meatus describent radio et surgentia sidera dicent : 850 tu regere imperio populos, Romane, memento (hae tibi erunt artes), pacisque imponere morem, parcere subiectis et debellare superbos.
Page 54 - I have attempted to convey, will break in upon the sanctity and truth of his pictures by transitory and accidental ornaments, and endeavour to excite admiration of himself by arts, the necessity of which must manifestly depend upon the assumed meanness of his subject.
Page 284 - ... there was scarce any condition in the world so miserable, but there was something negative or something positive to be thankful for in it ; and let this stand as a direction from the experience of the most miserable of all conditions in this world, that we may always find in it something to comfort ourselves from, and to set in the description of good and evil, on the credit side of the account...
Page 170 - I did consent, And often did beguile her of her tears, When I did speak of some distressful stroke That my youth suffer'd. My story being done, She gave me for my pains a world of sighs : She swore, in faith, 'twas strange, 'twas passing strange, 'Twas pitiful, 'twas wondrous pitiful...

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