Philosophy of Conduct: A Treatise of the Facts, Principles, and Ideals of Ethics

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C. Scribner's sons, 1902 - 663 pages
 

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Page 259 - He saith unto them, Moses because of the hardness of your hearts suffered you to put away your wives: but from the beginning it was not so.
Page 518 - Who, trimm'd in forms and visages of duty, Keep yet their hearts attending on themselves; And, throwing but shows of service on their lords, Do well thrive by them, and when they have lin'd their coats, Do themselves homage: these fellows have some soul; And such a one do I profess myself.
Page 400 - Not now as a servant, but above a servant, a brother beloved, specially to me, but how much more unto thee, both in the flesh, and in the Lord?
Page 424 - In this thing the LORD pardon thy servant, that when my master goeth into the house of Rimmon to worship there, and he leaneth on my hand, and I bow myself in the house of Rimmon : when I bow down myself in the house of Rimmon, the LORD pardon thy servant in this thing.
Page 51 - Nothing is here for tears, nothing to wail Or knock the breast, no weakness, no contempt. Dispraise or blame, nothing but well and fair. And what may quiet us in a death so noble.
Page 350 - And now, Israel, what doth the Lord thy God require of thee, but to fear the Lord thy God, to walk in all his ways, and to love him, and to serve the Lord thy God with all thy heart and with all thy soul...
Page 265 - Reuben, thou art my first-born, my might, and the beginning of my strength, the excellency of dignity, and the excellency of power. Unstable as water, thou shalt not excel; because thou wentest up to thy father's bed; then defiledst thou it. He went up to my couch.
Page 286 - For there is not a just man upon earth, that doeth good, and sinneth not.
Page 471 - How good is man's life, the mere living! how fit to employ All the heart and the soul and the senses for ever in joy!
Page 103 - Whoever hesitates to utter that which he thinks the highest truth, lest it should be too much in advance of the time, may reassure himself by looking at his acts from an impersonal point of view.

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