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" You wait on nature's mischief! Come, thick night, And pall thee in the dunnest smoke of hell, That my keen knife see not the wound it makes, Nor heaven peep through the blanket of the dark, To cry 'Hold, hold! "
The North British Review - Page 48
1869
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The Rambler [by S. Johnson and others]., Volume 7

1752 - 204 pages
...pall thee in the dunneft fmoke of hell, That my keen knife fee not the wound it makes ; Nor Heav'n peep through the blanket of the dark, To cry, Hold, hold! In this paflage is exerted all the force of poetry ; that force which calls new powers into being, which embodies...
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The British Plutarch, Or Biographical Entertainer: Being a Select Collection ...

1762 - 414 pages
...he thus exprefles himfelf: • " Come thick night " And veil thee, in die dunneft fpoke of hell, " Nor heaven peep through the blanket of the dark, " To cry, hold, hold. That 2 That the words dunneft, and blanket, which are fo common in vulgar mouths, deftroy, in fome...
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Mr. William Shakespeare: His Comedies, Histories, and Tragedies, Volume 4

William Shakespeare - 1767 - 404 pages
...fmoak of hell ! That my keen knife fee not the wound it makes; < And that which rather 2: and hit, Nor heaven peep through the blanket of the dark, To cry, Hold, bald ! — Great Glamis ! worthy Ca-ivdor ! Enter MACBETH. Greater than both, by the all-hail hereafter...
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Hamlet, Prince of Denmark: A Tragedy

William Shakespeare - 1770 - 956 pages
...nature's mifchief. Come, thick night ! And pall thee in the dunneft fmoak of hell, That my keen knife fee not the wound it makes ; Nor heaven peep through the blanket of the dark, To cry, Hold, hold ! Enter Macbeth. Great Glamis ! worthy Cawdor ! . r [Embracing him, Greater than both, by the all-hail...
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The Works of Shakespeare in Twelve Volumes: Collated with the ..., Volume 9

William Shakespeare - 1772 - 364 pages
...mifchief. — Come, thick night! And pall thee iu the dunneft fmoke of hell, That iny keen knife fee not the wound it makes ; Nor Heaven peep through the blanket of the dark, To cry, hold, hold ! Enter MACBETH. Great Glamis ! worthy Cawdor ! [Embracing him. Greater than both, by the all-hail...
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All's well that ends well. Twelfth Night. Winter's tale. Macbeth

William Shakespeare - 1773 - 558 pages
...mifchief ! — Come, thick night, 7 And pall thee in the dunneft fmoke of hell ! That my keen knife fee not the wound it makes; Nor heaven peep through the blanket of the dark, * To cry, bold, bold! Enter cannot be doubted that Shakefpeare wrote differently, perhaps thus, That no compunBious...
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The Plays of William Shakespeare in Ten Volumes: With Corrections ..., Volume 4

William Shakespeare - 1778 - 632 pages
...to obtain niy vile defire : 7 And pall thec in the dnnneft frnoke of hell ! That my keen knife 8 fee not the wound it makes,' Nor heaven peep through the blanket of the dark9, 'To cry, Hold, bold! - Great Glamis ! worthy CawdorM Enter " Be then my coverture thick ugly...
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Stockdale's edition of Shakespeare, with explanatory notes

William Shakespeare - 1784 - 1118 pages
...mil'chief 4 ! Come, thick And pall ь thee in the dunnelt fmoke of hell ! Tliat my keen knife 6 fee not the wound it makes ; Nor heaven peep through the blanket of the dark, To cry, Hala, Ijold ^ .'—Great С brr. : ' worthyCawdor 1 Enter Mactiítb* Grear;r than both, by the all-hail...
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Macbeth, from the text of S. Johnson and G. Steevens, revised

William Shakespeare - 1784 - 116 pages
...sightless substances 370 You wait on nature's mischief ! Come, thick night*, And pall thee in the dunnest smoke of hell ! That my keen knife 'see not the wound it makes ; Tor heaven peep through the blanket of the dark*, To cry, Hold, hold I— — Great Glamis ! worthy...
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The Rambler

Samuel Johnson, John Hawkins - 1787 - 416 pages
...pall thee in the dunneft fmoke of hell, That my keen knife fee not the wound it makes ; Nor heav'n peep through the blanket of the dark, To cry, Hold, hold ! In this paffage is exerted all the force of poetry, that force which calls new powers into being, which embodies...
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