Ethnic Groups in Conflict, Updated Edition With a New Preface

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University of California Press, 2001 M04 9 - 720 pages
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Drawing material from dozens of divided societies, Donald L. Horowitz constructs his theory of ethnic conflict, relating ethnic affiliations to kinship and intergroup relations to the fear of domination. A groundbreaking work when it was published in 1985, the book remains an original and powerfully argued comparative analysis of one of the most important forces in the contemporary world.

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I have been assigning parts of this book to my university students for years. A combination of vivid writing and interesting, cogent thinking about timeless questions.

Contents

IV
xvii
V
51
VI
91
VII
137
VIII
181
IX
225
X
287
XI
329
XIV
439
XV
468
XVI
522
XVII
559
XVIII
597
XIX
649
XX
677
XXI
681

XII
361
XIII
392

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Popular passages

Page 24 - In their consequences they differ precisely in this way: ethnic coexistences condition a mutual repulsion and disdain but allow each ethnic community to consider its own honor as the highest one; the caste structure brings about a social subordination and an acknowledgment of 'more honor' in favor of the privileged caste and status groups. This is due to the fact that in the caste structure ethnic distinctions as such have become 'functional...
Page 105 - it is less frequently recognized that tribal movements may be created and instigated to action by the new men of power in furtherance of their own special interests which are, time and time again, the constitutive interests of emerging social classes. Tribalism then becomes a mask for class privilege.
Page 23 - status' segregation grown into a 'caste' differs in its structure from a mere 'ethnic' segregation: the caste structure transforms the horizontal and unconnected coexistences of ethnically segregated groups into a vertical social system of super- and subordination. Correctly formulated: a comprehensive societalization integrates the ethnically divided communities into specific political and communal action.
Page 100 - Ethnic groups persist largely because of their capacity to extract goods and services from the modern sector and thereby satisfy the demands of their members for the components of modernity.
Page 32 - The Development and Persistence of Ethnic Voting," in Lawrence H. Fuchs, ed., American Ethnic Politics (New York: Harper & Row, 1968...
Page 566 - Karl W. Deutsch and William J. Foltz, eds., Nation-Building (New York: Atherton Press, 1963). 2. For a discussion of some of the problems of territorial control in Africa see James S. Coleman, "Problems of Political Integration in Emergent Africa," Western Political Quarterly (March 1955): 844-57.
Page 448 - Morris Janowitz, The Military in the Political Development of New Nations (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1964); Samuel Huntington, Political Order in Changing Societies (New Haven, Conn.: Yale University Press, 1968), 222.
Page 99 - Social mobilization is a name given to an overall process of change which happens to substantial parts of the population in countries which are moving from traditional to modern ways of life.
Page 568 - Cynthia H. Enloe, Ethnic Conflict and Political Development, Boston, Little, Brown, 1973.
Page 251 - Modern Nationalism in Old Nations as a Consequence of Earlier State-Building: The Case of Basque-Spain," in Wendell Bell and Walter E.

About the author (2001)

Donald L. Horowitz is the James B. Duke professor of Law and Political Science at Duke University. He is also the author of A Democratic South Africa? Constitutional Engineering in a Divided Society (California, 1991), which won the Ralph Bunche Prize of the American Political Science Association, and coeditor of Immigrants in Two Democracies: French and American Experience (1992).

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